Student Loan Debt: Ongoing Hurdle to Homeownership

The U.S. currently has a student debt load of over $1.4 trillion, which accounts for 10 percent of all outstanding debt and 35 percent of non-housing debt. The magnitude of the debt continues to grow in size and share of the overall debt in the economy. While this amount of debt has risen, the homeownership rate has fallen, and fallen more steeply among younger generations. To evaluate those trends, SALT® and the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) teamed up to conduct a survey of student loan borrowers who are currently in repayment in a new report entitled “Student Loan Debt and Housing Report: When Debt Holds You Back.” Notably, the median student loan debt amount is $41,200.

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Among non-homeowners, 83 percent cite student loan debt as the factor delaying them from buying a home. This is most frequently the case due to the fact that the borrowers cannot save for a down payment because of their student debt. Seventy-four percent of those who are delayed don’t feel financially secure enough, and 52 percent can’t qualify for a mortgage due to debt-to-income ratios.

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Among homeowners, 28 percent say student debt has impacted their ability to sell an existing home and move to a different home. These homeowners face a variety of problems: 21 percent believe it is too expensive to move and upgrade to a new home; 4 percent have problems with their credit caused by student loan debt; and 3 percent are underwater on their home.

The delay in buying a home among homeowners is three years. For non-homeowners, that number rises to seven years. Thirty-two percent of non-homeowners expect to be delayed more than eight years. Those with higher amounts of student loan debt and those with lower incomes expect to be delayed longer from purchasing a home than those with higher incomes and lower amounts of debt.

Forty-two percent were delayed moving out of their family member’s home after college, regardless of whether they were buying a home. This delay has a financial impact on both parents and the student loan borrower. Twenty percent were delayed by at least two years in moving out of a family member’s home after college due to their student loans. While 20 percent are currently homeowners, 30 percent live with friends or family, and half (15 percent) do not pay rent. Twenty-eight percent rent with roommates and 16 percent rent solo.

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Among survey respondents, most are employed. Eighty-four percent are employed full-time, 6 percent are employed part-time and seeking full-time employment, and 3 percent are not employed. Seventy-nine percent received their loans from a four-year college, 19 percent from a two-year college, 29 percent from graduate/post-graduate school, and 7 percent from a technical college.

According to NAR’s Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers, among recent homebuyers, 27 percent have student loan debt and the typical amount is $25,000. The share of those with student loan debt rises to 40 percent among first-time homebuyers. Even among successful homebuyers, this amount of debt is cited as a difficulty in their home-buying process.

To find the full report, go to www.realtor.org/reports/student-loan-debt-and-housing-report.

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Brought you San Diego Real Estate Agent and Real Estate Broker, Glen Henderson.  Glen has been a San Diego Realtor for 15 years and has been involved in over 1,000 home sales throughout San Diego County.  Contact him today with any questions at 619-500-3222 or visit Premier Homes at www.MyPremierHomes.com

If you would like to Search Houses for Sale in San Diego, visit www.GreaterSanDiegoAreaHomes.com

Pending Home Sales Slip, Trampled by West

For the housing market, gaining ground is proving to be a struggle.

On an annual basis—and for the eighth month in a row—pending home sales slipped, according to the August National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI). Activity backtracked 1.8 percent month-over-month and 2.3 percent year-over-year.

According to the Index, activity contracted in all of the regions in the U.S. In the Midwest, activity declined 0.5 percent from July, and 1.1 percent from the prior year; in the Northeast, activity decreased 1.3 percent from July, and 1.6 percent from the prior year; in the South, activity dipped 0.7 percent from July, but rose 1.3 percent from the prior year; and in the West, activity fell 5.8 percent from July, and 11.3 percent from the prior year.

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“Pending home sales continued a slow drip downward, with the fourth month-over-month decline in the past five months,” says Lawrence Yun, chief economist at NAR. “Contract signings also fell backward again last month, as declines in the West negatively impacted overall activity. The greatest decline occurred in the West region, where prices have shot up significantly, which clearly indicates that affordability is hindering buyers—and those affordability issues come from lack of inventory, particularly in moderate price points.”

The good news? Yun anticipates relief—but at what point is uncertain.

“With prices having risen so quickly, many consumers were deciding to wait to list their homes hoping to see additional price and equity gains; however, with indications that buyers are beginning to pull out, price gains are going to decelerate and potential sellers are considering that now is a good time to list and bring more properties to the market,” Yun says.

Additionally, while affordability is being constrained by increasing rates, advancements on the employment front could offset the pressure.

“We have two opposing factors affecting the market: the negative impact of rising mortgage rates and the positive impact of continued job creation,” says Yun. “This should lead to future homes sales staying fairly neutral. As long as there is job growth, rising mortgage rates will hinder some buyers—but job creation means second or third incomes being added to households, which gives consumers the financial confidence to go out and make a home purchase.”

For more information, please visit www.nar.realtor. The post Pending Home Sales Slip, Trampled by West appeared first on RISMedia.

 

Brought you San Diego Real Estate Agent and Real Estate Broker, Glen Henderson.  Glen has been a San Diego Realtor for 15 years and has been involved in over 1,000 home sales throughout San Diego County.  Contact him today with any questions at 619-500-3222 or visit Premier Homes at www.MyPremierHomes.com

If you would like to Search Houses for Sale in San Diego, visit www.GreaterSanDiegoAreaHomes.com

Appraisers and Homeowners Sync Up on Value

Appraisers and homeowners are syncing up on value, with appraisals in April just 0.33 percent below what homeowners predicted, according to the Quicken Loans National Home Price Perception Index (HPPI). The Quicken Loans National Home Value Index (HVI) shows appraised values rose 6.47 percent year-over-year.

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The findings indicate homeowners are less likely to get a rude awakening when going through mortgage process; it is the closest the national appraiser and owner opinions have been in more than three years.

“The appraisal is one of the most important, although sometimes least predictable, parts of the mortgage process,” says Bill Banfield, executive vice president of Capital Markets at Quicken Loans. “The Home Price Perception Index is a way to illustrate the differences of opinion, and these differences affect everything from the type of mortgage a borrower can get to the expectations a seller has about the proceeds available upon sale of their home.”

Homeowner opinions are also improving when viewed locally. Less than 20 percent of the areas measured have appraisal values lower than estimated. San Jose is leading the way, with the average appraisal 2.75 percent higher than expected, and Chicago is trailing all cities, with appraisals an average of 1.68 percent lower than estimated. Only five of the 27 metro areas observed in the HPPI reported appraisals lower than what owners estimated.

While they are more in line with what owners expected, home values are continuing their ascent over last year’s level. The HVI reported a healthy 6.47 percent year-over-year increase, despite near-stagnant monthly change, with a 0.05 percent dip in home values since March. The HVI was pulled into the negative by the Northeast—the only region showing a decrease in home value, at a 1.24 percent decline. The Northeast was still the lowest when reviewing annual changes; however, all regions were positive, ranging from the Northeast’s 2.22 percent growth to the 9.44 percent jump in the West.

“The skyrocketing home values in the West is a trend with no end in sight,” Banfield says. “Until home-building pace picks up, in combination with more existing homes being listed for sale, affordability will continue to wane. The other regions of the country are showing annual price gains as well, but at a more moderate pace. Time will tell if the slightly higher interest rates in 2018 start to slow demand, or if the inventory shortage ends up being a larger contributor to price changes.”

For more information, please visit QuickenLoans.com/Indexes.

The post Appraisers and Homeowners Sync Up on Value appeared first on RISMedia.

Brought you San Diego Real Estate Agent and Real Estate Broker, Glen Henderson.  Glen has been a San Diego Realtor for 15 years and has been involved in over 1,000 home sales throughout San Diego County.  Contact him today with any questions at 619-500-3222 or visit Premier Homes at www.MyPremierHomes.com

If you would like to Search Houses for Sale in San Diego, visit www.GreaterSanDiegoAreaHomes.com