Don’t Let a Killer In

Arizona enacted a law many years ago that requires a carbon monoxide detector within 15 feet of every “sleeping area” before the home is sold. Arizona is pretty good about this as they only cost $40-50 and are easy to install. Here is part of why the state legislature enacted this law…

Carbon monoxide is a silent killer you don’t want in your home but because it is colorless and odorless; you may not even be aware the deadly condition exists. The Center for Disease Control says more than 400 people in the U.S. die annually from carbon monoxide poisoning and over 10,000 require medical treatment each year.

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Unmaintained furnaces, water heaters and appliances can produce the deadly gas. In addition, other sources could be leaking chimneys, unvented kerosene or gas space heaters or exhaust from cars or trucks operating in an attached garage.

The Environmental Protection Agency suggests the following to reduce exposure in the home:

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to the outdoors over gas stoves
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use
  • Do not idle car inside garage
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean and tune-up central heating systems annually

Headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and feelings of weakness or fatigue are a few of the most common symptoms. Lower levels of exposure to carbon monoxide may be mistaken for the flu.

Carbon monoxide alarms should be on every level of a home and especially, in sleeping areas. The alarms can be purchased for as little as $25 and plugged into the wall like a night light.

Regardless of the government requirements, no one would want to put their family, guests or themselves at risk for something so deadly.

Please let me know if I can get you any further information on this topic.

Call 480-355-8645 Or Email Us Info@LocateArizonaHomes.com


Welcome to 3259 S Danielson Way, Chandler

Exclusive Listing at 3259 S Danielson Way in Chandler’s Markwood North,

This gracious, single-level home is conveniently located in sought-after Chandler Unified School District, near highways, major employers, parks & shopping.

Beautiful foyer graced with high arches welcomes you to this open, split floor plan. Vaulted ceilings and warm neutral colors make this turn-key. Home has just been upgraded with new exterior and interior paint and all new carpet.

Chef’s kitchen features gas cook top and gourmet hood, built-in double ovens, center island with breakfast bar, granite countertops, and custom oak cabinets featuring microwave cupboard, shelving and glass fronts.

Separate formal living and dining areas in addition to the open concept kitchen and family room. Master bedroom with ensuite master bath with double vanity, separate shower and garden tub.

Large, private rear year features full length covered patio with beautiful pavers that lead to eating area with barbecue, great for entertaining.

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For more information  Visit our websites: 

WWW.LocateArizonaHomes.com

http://www.locatearizonahomes.com/blog

Call 480-355-8645 Or Email Us Info@LocateArizonaHomes.com

Do You know the Tax Difference in Second Homes?

Many folks who live in the valley have 2nd homes in the mountains. Some are fishing cabins while others are condos for ski weekends, or you might find a true replacement residence. The truth is that some of the tax law changes form last year might affect those home owners. So read on…

A principal residence and a second home have some similar benefits, but they have some key tax differences. A principal residence is the primary home where you live and a second home is used mainly for personal enjoyment while limiting possible rental activity to a maximum of 14 days per year.

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Under the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the Mortgage Interest Deduction allows a taxpayer to deduct the qualified interest on a principal residence and a second home. The interest is reduced from a maximum of $1,000,000 combined acquisition debt to a maximum of $750,000 combined acquisition debt for both the first and second homes.

Property taxes on first and second homes are deductible but limited to a combined maximum of $10,000 together with other state and local taxes paid.

The gain on a principal residence retained the exclusion of $250,000/$500,000 for single/married taxpayers meeting the requirements. Unchanged by the new tax law, the gains on second homes must be recognized when sold or disposed.

Tax-deferred exchanges are not allowed for property used for personal purposes such as second homes. Gain on second homes owned for more than 12 months is taxed at the lower long-term capital gains rate.

This article is intended for informational purposes. Advice from a tax professional for your specific situation should be obtained prior to making a decision that can have tax implications.

I would love the opportunity to assist you in connecting with a tax professional!  Call or email me today 480.355.8645 OR Info@LocateArizonaHomes.com


When Neighbors Don’t Seem to Care

Many times I have addressed this issue when marketing a home for sale. In the old days neighbors would band together to water and mow the front yards of abandoned, or even properties that were in foreclosure. Some folks do run into financial issues. and my experience has been 2 fold: a. they appreciate the help or b. they bury their heads even further hoping things will fix themselves. Either way, a neighborly offer of help may be the most appropriate way of approaching the folks involved. You might even find they could use help from someone like myself (introductions appreciated).

A home that isn’t being maintained like others in the neighborhood can negatively affect your visual sense of appeal and in some extreme cases, even affect property values. It might be an overgrown yard, a fence in need of repair, excessive noise, unruly pets, paint peeling on the home or even a car or boat parked in front of the home that hasn’t moved in weeks.2676519-250.jpg

Most people want to be good neighbors and may be willing to correct an issue once it is brought to their attention. A practical, but possibly confrontational, solution is to contact the responsible person and describe your perception of the issue. However, they may not always agree with the same urgency and it might be necessary to seek other remedies.

An owner-occupant may be more sympathetic to the neighbors and willing to correct the issue. If you think the home might be a rental property, check with the county tax records to identify the owner. They may be unaware of the situation and welcome the notification to protect their investment.

Another alternative might be to notify the homeowner’s association, if there is one. One of the benefits of a HOA is to enforce community appearance standards as set in the covenants or bylaws that specify how properties must be maintained. This could be a less personal method of reaching a beneficial outcome.

If the source of the problem is a code or housing violation, the city may be the ultimate authority. Most cities have a separate code and neighborhood services division and some cities have 311 for non-emergency assistance.

Talk to your neighbor first! We friend that had a barking dog out back and she barked well into the early morning hours in our quiet  neighborhood. The past 5 years there was no history of this from the dog but their blood was boiling! When they had calmed down and called the neighbor explained his son had fallen off a roof, broken his neck, and they had been spending their days and nights at the hospital, never thinking about the dog. So before you turn them in to the authorities, or any other part of the world, be neighborly and talk to them first.

If you need any assistance with tax records or HOA information, feel free to contact us, we would love to help!

Info@LocateArizonaHomes.com  480.355.8645